Live Better
 
 

Collective wisdom: Food

Gems of wisdom from the experts, helping you make smart choices for nourishing, nutritious food

Over the last seven issues of be. magazine we’ve amassed and shared a wealth of information about all things food and nutrition. Here, we bring together a collection of highlights to inspire you…

“Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.”

– Michael Pollan, author

“We have shown that people whose diets are healthier are less likely to experience depression, while those that eat more unhealthy and ‘junk’ foods are at increased risk of depression.”

– Associate professor Felice Jacka

“Brush your teeth before breakfast to remove mouth bacteria that builds up on your teeth overnight and to avoid brushing away softened enamel from acidic drinks like orange juice.”

– Dr. Priya Lal, dentist

“The long-lived people in the Blue Zones don’t avoid dairy foods or gluten. They don’t calculate the glycaemic index of their meals. They don’t ruminate on whether the grains they are eating are stopping the absorption of other nutrients. They don’t take supplements. They eat. They move. They enjoy. They socially engage with their community in person. They live.”

– Associate Professor Tim Crowe

“Try to sit at the dinner table to eat instead of in front of the TV. That can be hard for some people if they’re used to always eating with the TV on, so maybe then a good compromise could be sitting on the couch like you’re used to, but turn the TV off, have the phone on silent or in another room, and pay attention to what you’re eating.”

– Lesh Karan, The Mindful Foodie

Tips for taking mindful meals

  1. Take a break and move away from your desk or lounge. Purposefully move to another room to sit and eat.
  2. Make meals that require more preparation than just peeling a wrapper.
  3. Eat meals, not snacks.
  4. Eat slowly and savour the flavour.
  5. Eat with other people.
  6. Practise remembering everything you ate yesterday

– Professor David Cameron-Smith

Top food tips

  • Eat slowly. Chew your food well.
  • Listen to your stomach – stop when you’re at a comfortable 5 out of 10 full.
  • Keep portions modest.
  • Don’t drink alcohol each and every night.
  • Drink more water.
  • Eat a salad a day.
  • Don’t buy junk food – if it’s not in the cupboard, you won’t be tempted. Nor will the kids.

– Catherine Saxelby, nutritionist

“With each passing day, small but positive steps to change from unhealthy foods to healthier options are giving your brain, immune system and heart the time needed to change for the better.”

– Professor David Cameron-Smith

“If everything was as balanced today as it was in my grandmother’s day, then we’d all be a hell of a lot healthier.”

– Rebecca Sullivan, food author

“80 per cent of health is about providing the body with the right nutrition.”

– Anthony Koutoufides, former AFL footballer

“We can make a commitment to promote vegetables and fruits and whole grains on every part of every menu. We can make portion sizes smaller and emphasize quality over quantity. And we can help create a culture – imagine this – where our kids ask for healthy options instead of resisting them.”

– Michelle Obama, First Lady of the United States

“A dietary pattern that is made up of mostly unprocessed plant foods and which is low in highly processed foods and sugar consistently comes out on top in offering the best long-term health.”

– Associate Professor Tim Crowe

Recommended Reading

Roasted cauliflower and macadamia salad recipe

The salty crunch of nuts makes this salad a real delight.

Read more

Asparagus and feta frittata recipe

Thyme and feta bring a delicious flavour to this dish.

Read more

Chickpea, beetroot and pumpkin salad recipe

This delicious salad is both simple and impressive.

Read more

Butter and sage sauce recipe

A simple Italian classic, delicious tossed through pasta.

Read more

10 healthy lunchbox snacks kids love

Delicious snacks that will guarantee empty lunchboxes.

Read more

Is Australia losing its sweet tooth?

Dietitian Dr Alan Barclay looks at the latest research.

Read more

Winter bruschetta two ways recipe

Two delicious toppings - Tuscan kale and broad bean.

Read more