Trippy tie-dye soup recipe

Brighten up your winter with this rich, tasty and oh-so-wholesome soup from My New Roots

Serves: 8

Ingredients

4 medium onions (about 500 g)

3 large leeks, white and pale green parts only, sliced

2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee

fine sea salt

7 garlic cloves

1 teaspoon smoked paprika

3 medium beetroots (about 675 g), peeled and roughly chopped

4 1⁄2 cups / 1.1 litres vegetable broth

2 cups / 330 g cooked white beans (about one 425 g can)

2 tablespoons cold-pressed olive oil

freshly cracked black pepper

1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley or chives, for garnish

Method

1. Chop the onions and leeks, and divide them between two separate pots. Divide the coconut oil between the two pots. Heat both pots over medium-high heat and stir to coat the vegetables with the oil. Season with sea salt. Let cook for 5 to 10 minutes, until softened.

2. Mince 3 garlic cloves. Add the minced garlic and the paprika to one of the pots, and cook for another minute. Then add the beetroots and 2 cups / 45 0ml of the broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the beetroots are fork-tender, 15 to 20 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, mince the remaining 4 garlic cloves. Add that minced garlic to the second pot of onions and leeks and cook for a couple minutes. Add the beans, the remaining 21⁄2 cups / 560 ml broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the beet soup is ready.

4. Ladle the bean soup into a blender. Add 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and blend on high speed until completely smooth. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the soup back into the pot.

5. Without cleaning the blender, ladle the beetroot soup into it. Add the lemon juice and the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil, and blend on high speed until completely smooth. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the soup back into the pot.

6. To serve, ladle one soup into each bowl, followed by the other soup on the other side. Using a toothpick, swirl the soups together into a tie-dye pattern. Have fun with it! Garnish with chopped parsley. Serve hot.

Recipe from My New Roots by Sarah Britton, available now from Pan Macmillan Australia.

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