Support cancer research this Daffodil Day

Reduce the impact of cancer for all Australians by supporting the Cancer Council this Daffodil Day.

Each day around 350 Australians are told they have a life-threatening cancer. Treatments and survival rates are improving, but there is still a vital need for more funds and more research to help work towards better outcomes for more people across the country.

Daffodil Day, held this year on Friday 22 August, raises funds that will help the Cancer Council continue its important work in cancer research, providing patient support and cancer prevention programs, with a vision to minimise the impact of cancer for all Australians. This year, Daffodil Day aims to raise over $9.7 million to fund the cancer control initiatives, patient support and research services of Cancer Council’s eight state and territory member organisations.

How you can help cancer research

You can help out by supporting the Cancer Council this Daffodil Day – buy a pin, make a donation, or even just help spread awareness. Every little bit helps to make a difference for cancer patients and their families all over Australia. Here are a few ways your contribution can help…

  • $5 can help give a newly-diagnosed cancer patient important support and information resources to help them on their journey.
  • $10 can help provide free exercise programs to help cancer patients regain strength and fitness during and after treatment.
  • $25 can help transport cancer patients to and from hospital for treatment.
  • $100 can help provide free accommodation for cancer patients, their families and carers during treatment.
  • $500 can help fund ground-breaking research into new and better ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer.

Cancer In Australia: the facts

The Cancer Council says…

  • Cancer is a leading cause of death in Australia, accounting for 3 in 10 deaths.
  • This year, an estimated 128,000 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in Australia this year. The number is expected to rise to 150,000 by 2020
  • 1 in 2 Australian men and 1 in 3 Australian women will be diagnosed with cancer by the age of 85.
  • Every day in Australia, around 350 people are told they have a life-threatening cancer.
  • Each day in Australia, more than 115 people will die of the disease.
  • The most common cancers in Australia (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) are prostate cancer, bowel cancer, breast cancer, melanoma and lung cancer.

Here’s the good news…

  • More than 60% of cancer patients will survive more than five years after diagnosis.
  • The survival rate for many common cancers has increased by 30 per cent in the past two decades.
  • The Cancer Council invests approximately $50 million a year into research into the causes of cancer, prevention and improved treatments.

Find out more at daffodilday.com.au or cancer.org.au

 

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