Canberra bans sugary drinks in schools

Canberra public schools will be banned from selling fruit juice and soft drink in vending machines.

Chief Minister Katy Gallagher announced the ban on sugary drinks in public school vending machines and encouraged private schools to follow suit.

“The government is taking a firm approach to this plan and will remove sugary drinks from vending machines by the end of this term,” she said. “The ACT government has a clear plan to reduce the amount of people who are overweight and obese and a key way to achieve that is to reduce the availability of sugary drinks to children.”

Vending machines will be replaced with water refill stations and reusable drink bottles, and school canteens will be asked to phase out soft drinks and fruit juices by the end of the year. A 375 mL can of Coke contains almost 40 g of sugar, while packaged juice varieties can often contain 20 g or more. Fruit juices that are 99 per cent fruit may be sold in small quantities.

The move to ban sugary drinks is part of a larger strategy aimed at creating healthier generations. Last year, data from the Council of Australian Governments showed the percentage of Canberrans who were overweight or obese had reached a record high of 63 per cent, and the proportion of children who were overweight or obese had climbed 25 per cent.

To combat this, the ACT government is set to launch a new healthy food program for schools, as well as $2.2 million worth of grants for health programs to tackle obesity in the ACT. This includes new school food and drink policy with guidelines that will mandate the implementation of the National Healthy School Canteen Guidelines in ACT government schools.

Recommended reading - Protecting your vision

Lifestyle

23 facts about your eyes

Take a look at some of the unknowns of your most precious sense.

Read more
Experts

5 ways to protect your eyes this summer

Don't let the summer sun damage your eyes – OPSM shares some top tips for keeping your eyes safe

Read more
Experts

Caring for aging eyes

Understanding how our vision changes as we get older, and how to keep our eyes in good condition.

Read more
Experts

Food for healthy eyes

Ophthalmologist Dr Eric Mayer gives us some food for thought on nourishing our eyes.

Read more
Experts

Hayfever treatment

Hay fever, also known as allergic rhinitis afflicts up to 40% of Australians.

Read more
Experts

How to care for contact lenses

Keep those contacts clean! Here's how to avoid common complications with your lenses.

Read more
Community

Amazing eye facts

Optometrists Association Australia provides reasons why you should visit an optometrist.

Read more
Lifestyle

6 creative developments in health tech

Sci-fi or reality? The latest innovations in the brave new world of health tech are unbelievable.

Read more
Advice

Protect your eyes on the run

All you need to know about protecting your eyes as you clock up the kilometres.

Read more
Experts

Sun safety: How to protect your eyes

Your vision is unique - Opthamologist Gerard Sutton explains how and why you should protect it.

Read more
Experts

How to prevent eye injuries

Keep those eyes safe during sport. The Vision Eye Institute shares some expert advice

Read more
Experts

Myopia: Myths and facts about short-sightedness

What’s the best way to manage myopia? Professor Kathryn Rose explains the facts of short-sightedness

Read more
Lifestyle

Sight set on eye health

Aussie rocker Kirk Pengilly discusses eye health, specs and health challenges of touring.

Read more
Lifestyle

The history of glasses

Where would we be without glasses? Nick Snelling takes a close look at the evolution of eyewear.

Read more
Community

The role of an optometrist

Optometrist Julia Kapov explains how an optometrist can help you on your journey to better health.

Read more

For full functionality of this site it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.