10km intermediate running guide

An 8-week training guide for people looking to improve their 10km time.

10km ‘Next level’ training guide

For those who have finished a few 5km and 10km races and are running fairly regularly, your next goal might be to take your running up a level in intensity.  The 10km ‘Next level’ training guide, one step up from the 10km ‘I can do this’ training guide, is designed to help you do just this.

To take your running to the next level you need to improve both your endurance and your speed. The best way to do this is by increasing the length of your runs, the pace you’re running at and by combining distance and speed training sessions. This training guide incorporates these principles so that you can start to see improvements in your 10km running times and push yourself further on race day.

Here is an explanation of the terms used in the 10km ‘Next level’ training guide: 

Runs: The 5km -10km runs on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays need to be run at a comfortable pace. If you use a heart monitor to measure your level of intensity, a comfortable pace would be running between 65 to 75 percent of maximum.

Rest: Rest is a very important part of training as it allows your muscles to repair and grow after exertion. Monitor your fatigue during the training program to assess if you need an additional day off – Monday would be best.

Pace: When referring to pace the program means race pace, the speed at which you aim to run your 10km race in. Like the tempo runs, you want to start and finish easy. The guide outlines total distance of the run plus the approximate distance that should be run at race pace.

Speedwork: Interval training where you alternate fast running with jogging or walking is an effective form of speedwork. Run the 400m at a medium intensity, walk or jog between each, then repeat. Ideally these sessions are done on a local athletics track, but they can be done anywhere. Hint, time one 400m run and from there run based on time i.e. 90sec intervals.

Tempo runs: This training technique involves continuous runs with an easy beginning, a build up in the middle, then ease back and cruise to the finish. A typical tempo run begins with 5-10 minutes easy running, continues with 10-15 faster running, and finishes with 5-10 minutes cooling down.

Warm-up: Especially important before your speed workouts, a good warm-up is to jog one km or two, sit down and stretch for 5-10 minutes, then run some easy strides (100m at near race pace). Cool down afterwards by doing half of the warm-up.

Stretch + strengthen: Stretching is key to a strong, supple body and should be done daily. Strength training, particularly for your core muscles, is an important focus of this training guide. Bodyweight-based activities like push-ups, chin-ups or dips are beneficial or light weights with high reps at your local gym.

Cross-training: On Saturdays your cross-training could be biking, swimming or any aerobic activity. You can maintain activity, without tiring yourself for the next day’s running workout.

Long runs: This program suggests a slight increase in the distance of your long runs as you get closer to race date: from 6km to 12km. Run at a comfortable pace and enjoy these runs, the aim is to get your legs comfortable with the distance and help build endurance.

Download the full guide here.

Recommended reading - Get involved with parkrun

Lifestyle

Parkrun: What to expect

Want to give parkrun a go? Here's everything you need to know for your first time.

Read more
Community

People of parkrun: David

David was obese and out of confidence, but turned his life around after attending a Parkrun.

Read more
Community

People of parkrun: Melissa

Be inspired by Melissa's story, showing how mental resilience can guide you past adversity.

Read more
Community

People of parkrun: Trish

Even after weight loss, it wasn't until Trish started attending Parkrun that she made real progress.

Read more
Lifestyle

4 ways to prevent running injuries

Look after your body while you run. Here's how to lower your chances of getting injured.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: Chris Walker

Chris Walker explains why he continues to run and raise funds for various causes.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: Deb and Gerred Sherwood

Deb Sherwood and son Gerred share why they will be running at the Medibank Family Run.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: Enrique Suana

Enrique Suana on how his passion for running allows him to give something back to the sport he loves.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: Peter Ryan

Peter Ryan on why he's been running marathons since 1978.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: The Wilson Family

The Wilson family on combining their love for the outdoors with a special cause close to their hearts.

Read more
Community

Why I run: Annie Crawford

Annie Crawford's philanthropic contributions created Can Too, which raises money for cancer research.

Read more

For full functionality of this site it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.